Things and Creatures

A blog about all things involving radical politics & youth work. Literature reviews, stories of working with youth, news involving radical/left youth, radical education, radical parenting, attachment parenting, event postings & so on.
humansofnewyork:

"I once threw a pen at a kid’s head for raising his hand in class and saying that PMS should disqualify women from leadership positions."

humansofnewyork:

"I once threw a pen at a kid’s head for raising his hand in class and saying that PMS should disqualify women from leadership positions."

If I am ten minutes late to class with Starbucks it would be a funny but benignly sexist joke if I was a white girl, but because I’m a Black girl then it means that I don’t take my education seriously and maybe do not deserve my academic scholarship.

If my grammar in a paper is not impeccable then it’s because I can’t speak “proper” English and maybe I should be in a remedial class and not an English major. If I am struggling in a class then instead of being directed towards a tutor, I will be encouraged to drop the course.

If I do not have a flawless transcript and academic record then I am unlikely to be encouraged to apply for prestigious fellowships and scholarships, even while non-Black classmates who have the same transcript will be funneled into these programs.

To a non-Black person all of this might sound highly improbable or exaggerated. And yet, this is my life. And it’s the life of many other Black students at PWI’s.

And so it’s no wonder that many Black students at PWI’s learn to over-compensate by attempting to excel beyond their classmates. It is no coincidence that many Black students cannot relate to the hegemonic narrative of college in which students party and occasionally attend class all while largely being protected from the “real world.”

College is a microcosm of the real world for Black students who deal with the omnipresent threat of being viewed as not good enough. And even when we excel beyond our classmates, at the end of the day we will be followed by police and harassed and questioned about whether we’re even students.

The scrutiny encourages unhealthy coping mechanisms. Tokenism after all is cumulative of what occurs when white supremacy, perfectionism, and capitalist notions of individualism and the need to be productive all collide and pressure Black folks to forget they’re human like everybody else.

humansofnewyork:

"Let me tell you what’s happening to me. I’m on the PTA at my child’s school, the Secondary School of Journalism in Park Slope. I’m currently advocating on behalf of my child, and seventeen other children whose parents don’t speak English. These kids are from Ecuador, Peru, El Salvador, Dominican Republic, everywhere. These kids have all done very well on their Regent’s exams— I’m talking 90/95th percentile. Very smart kids. They were on their way toward qualifying for an Advanced Regents government scholarship,that would give their parents badly needed money to help in their education. But the fine print of that scholarship says the children need three full years of a foreign language. 
And the principal at the school FIRED the Spanish teacher. She is not hiring another foreign language teacher for an entire year, effectively disqualifying all these kids from that scholarship they need. When we try to talk with her about it, she acts like she doesn’t owe us an explanation. When we try to call the Board of Education, they tell us to put it in writing. They get us all excited. They have us think if we write a nice letter, and use good grammar, and use all the correct punctuation, something will happen. Meanwhile another year passes, and nothing. And the kids don’t get their scholarship. You know something like this would never happen at a nice Manhattan school like Stuyvesant.
We’ve got a new mayor and a new chancellor. So we aren’t blaming them. But they need to know how impossible they’ve made it to help our kids. Trying to get something fixed in these schools is like praying to some false God. You call and email hoping that God is listening, and nothing happens. Meanwhile the kids suffer. All these parents that I’m representing are good, simple people. They say: ‘Don’t worry Annette, God is going to fix it. God will make it right.’ I love them. And I love God. But I tell them: ‘God won’t fix it! We’ve got to fix it!’”

humansofnewyork:

"Let me tell you what’s happening to me. I’m on the PTA at my child’s school, the Secondary School of Journalism in Park Slope. I’m currently advocating on behalf of my child, and seventeen other children whose parents don’t speak English. These kids are from Ecuador, Peru, El Salvador, Dominican Republic, everywhere. These kids have all done very well on their Regent’s exams— I’m talking 90/95th percentile. Very smart kids. They were on their way toward qualifying for an Advanced Regents government scholarship,that would give their parents badly needed money to help in their education. But the fine print of that scholarship says the children need three full years of a foreign language. 

And the principal at the school FIRED the Spanish teacher. She is not hiring another foreign language teacher for an entire year, effectively disqualifying all these kids from that scholarship they need. When we try to talk with her about it, she acts like she doesn’t owe us an explanation. When we try to call the Board of Education, they tell us to put it in writing. They get us all excited. They have us think if we write a nice letter, and use good grammar, and use all the correct punctuation, something will happen. Meanwhile another year passes, and nothing. And the kids don’t get their scholarship. You know something like this would never happen at a nice Manhattan school like Stuyvesant.

We’ve got a new mayor and a new chancellor. So we aren’t blaming them. But they need to know how impossible they’ve made it to help our kids. Trying to get something fixed in these schools is like praying to some false God. You call and email hoping that God is listening, and nothing happens. Meanwhile the kids suffer. All these parents that I’m representing are good, simple people. They say: ‘Don’t worry Annette, God is going to fix it. God will make it right.’ I love them. And I love God. But I tell them: ‘God won’t fix it! We’ve got to fix it!’”

magnacarterholygrail:

thelazyavenger:

poetic-floetry:

simplynastassia:

sup—puta:

spiffygoblin:

Black Kids Anthem

I need a full track bruh

Yass

Ayye

best track of 2014 thus far

(Source: xoxwanderlustxox, via homoclandestino-deactivated2014)

Why should kids be taught to hate the police? Because there are 2.3 million people in jail in the US right now and every single one was put there by a fucking cop. Some people talk about good cops and bad cops, but a good cop, a cop doing their job properly, still puts nonviolent drug users in jail for many years, totally ruining their lives as they lose their jobs, houses, cars, romantic partners, access to college, and become substantially less employable upon release. A cop doing their job properly still gives homeless people tickets for vagrancy which they obviously can’t pay and when a warrant is issued as a result an officer doing their job properly arrests those homeless people. An officer doing their job properly peppersprays and arrests environmental protesters so that logging companies can clear-cut old growth forests. An officer doing their job properly is evicting a family from their home as you read this because the parents’ jobs were shipped overseas so that the bosses could make eight figures a year instead of seven. Those people will become homeless, vagrancy tickets will be written, warrants will be issued… And then there’s the “bad ones”.

Sacking Rome: A Magazine for Vandals, issue one

nicely put.

waroncops.tumblr.com

(via waroncops)

Fucking thank you. There are no good cops, only deadlier ones

(via strugglingtobeheard)

(via homoclandestino-deactivated2014)

I can’t un-know the monsters
but I can become the person
who would have saved
thirteen-year-old me.

3/365, wesley king  (via batglitch)

(via bbseamonster)

therumpus:

schoollibraryjournal:

“Straight Talk on Race” declared the headline of a powerful feature story in School Library Journal (SLJ), written by author Mitali Perkins, with the subhead the piece urging librarians and teachers to critically examine the stereotypes in literature for children. That piece ran on our cover back in 2009, yet the issues around representation persist. This May, SLJ will dedicate an entire issue of the magazine to the topic of diversity in various forms. And we welcome your feedback.
(via SLJ to Publish Dedicated Issue on Diversity | School Library Journal)

Ugh, so proud of and so excited for SLJ's diversity issues this year and many years to come!

therumpus:

schoollibraryjournal:

“Straight Talk on Race” declared the headline of a powerful feature story in School Library Journal (SLJ), written by author Mitali Perkins, with the subhead the piece urging librarians and teachers to critically examine the stereotypes in literature for children. That piece ran on our cover back in 2009, yet the issues around representation persist.
This May, SLJ will dedicate an entire issue of the magazine to the topic of diversity in various forms. And we welcome your feedback.

(via SLJ to Publish Dedicated Issue on Diversity | School Library Journal)

Ugh, so proud of and so excited for SLJ's diversity issues this year and many years to come!